|   In the News

Dyne Therapeutics Emerges With $50M to Take On Rare Muscle Disease

One problem with drugs for muscular disorders is that not enough medicine reaches the muscle, says Romesh Subramanian, CEO of Dyne Therapeutics. Subramanian’s startup has developed a way to target delivery of drugs to all muscle types, and it is emerging from stealth with $50 million in funding to advance its compounds toward human testing.

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  |   In the News

Atlas wraps Arteaus story with $260M royalty sale as Emgality sales inches upward

Six months after Eli Lilly notched a second-runner-up approval for its CGRP migraine drug Emgality, the Atlas-founded biotech that brought it over the proof-of-concept gate five years ago has sold all its royalty interest for $260 million.

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  |   LifeSciVC

Arteaus’ Final Chapter: Monetization Of The Emgality Royalties

By Bruce Booth, DPhil, Partner

Back in September 2018, the FDA approved Lilly’s Emgality, an anti-CGRP antibody therapy, for the preventative treatment of episodic and chronic migraine.

Arteaus Therapeutics, a biotech company founded by Atlas Venture in 2011, played a critical role in Emgality’s early development, helping it rapidly advance from its first-in-human studies through a randomized, controlled, double-blinded Phase 2 Proof of Concept (PoC) trial in only 30 months.

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  |   LifeSciVC

Sharing An Innate Desire To Address Inflammation: Novartis and IFM Team Up

By Bruce Booth, DPhil, Partner

Today Novartis announced the acquisition of IFM Therapeutics’ portfolio of NLRP3 antagonists, via the purchase of IFM Tre, a subsidiary of IFM (here, here). These immunomodulatory medicines target the inflammasome, a key innate immune node whose pathologic chronic activation is associated with several metabolic, fibrotic, autoimmune, and neurological diseases.

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  |   In the News

Novartis acquires Boston-based IFM Tre for work on drugs to modify the immune system

It’s the lucky biotech that has a short and sweet runway. Most companies bring a drug to market — and begin to bring in revenue — only after years or decades of work.

But a company backed by Atlas Venture that’s less than a year old is the first acquisition of 2019 for Novartis. The pharmaceutical giant is paying more than $300 million upfront for IFM Tre, a Boston-based startup, in a deal that could be worth more than $1.5 billion if the company’s drugs meet certain undisclosed milestones.

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